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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I fill it up and I get the warning about 5 days later. So it must have a leak right? Well I don't see any fluid in my garage ever. Where is it going?

Where would I look for a leak? Suspected area? I am confused where the fluid is going :huh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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I vote for the gnomes, as they only appear in certain areas.
 

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Ok, I read the entire thing. Thanks BTW. Evaporation? No way, I don't buy it. Is that what everyone stands behind?

How would it evaporate half a gallon in less than 10 days when I hardly use the ICE. It has to be leaking or is it engine Gnomes? :dodgy:
The math says you're losing about 6 oz a day or 1/4 oz an hour. This is considered a slow leak. In fact, depending on temperature, pressure and humidity, even water, which has a relatively high molecular weight, can evaporate that fast.

However, windshield wiper fluid contains alcohols such as methanol and ethylene glycol that evaporate nearly twice as fast as water. And to make detecting a slow leak even more difficult, the coloring in the fluid, generally blue, fades to clear on concrete.

Because windshield wiper fluid is highly poisonous to animals and is bad for the environment, some people choose to mix their own wiper fluid as follows:

8 oz. isopropyl rubbing alcohol (high proof vodka can be substituted)
1 oz. liquid castile soap
4 drops of blue food coloring

The food coloring should make it easier to detect a leak. (It's generally a good idea to check with FA or your CSP before substituting any homemade product that might affect seals, tubing and nozzles.) Also you have to be concerned about these substitute fluids freezing in cold weather.

In any event, I avoid using wiper fluid because it tends to spray all over the headlights, hood, solar panel, trunk lid and beyond. Then again, it might be useful as a defensive weapon if someone is tailgating. Instead, I get out my can of Windex Foaming Cleaner, spray it on the windshield, run my over-sized wipers on high speed for a few seconds, and then wipe off the excess foam on the sides with a clean terrycloth rag. Everything else I've tried, including plain dish soap and water, tends to streak and smear.
 

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My own experience is that fluid disappears much faster when running on ICE. So that lands credibility to evaporation theory, although in none of my previous cars that happened. Another possibility is that something is pressurizing the tank where fluid is and fluid is being pushed through the pipe under the cap. I had my mechanics trying to pressurized the tank to check for leaks but could not find any. Another mysterious behaviour from Karma.
Last year I put the car in the garage corner and for the past year I am driving Tesla P85D. Much happier experience, although the car is not as good looking.
 

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The muffler is below the washer tank
Would it make sense to put in thermal insulation between them, or does the muffler get too hot for that to work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Would it make sense to put in thermal insulation between them, or does the muffler get too hot for that to work?
So I forgot to mention I spoke to Joost at the Revero event in Atlanta about this. He said it would not help at all. He said the new Revero has a bigger tank and is closed loop so this evaporation won't be an issue.

I guess it's another minor thing we have to deal with. You can try it, but I'm not wasting my time.
 

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He said the new Revero has a bigger tank and is closed loop so this evaporation won't be an issue.
I get that the bigger tank would help, but I don't understand how they can make the windshield washing system, whose specific purpose is to spray water out the tank, into a closed loop. That's like saying that the faucet in your kitchen is part of a closed loop. Maybe he meant that it is sealed? A cooling system where all the liquid stays in a sealed environment is a closed loop. The windshield washing system is the exact opposite.
 

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I get that the bigger tank would help, but I don't understand how they can make the windshield washing system, whose specific purpose is to spray water out the tank, into a closed loop. That's like saying that the faucet in your kitchen is part of a closed loop. Maybe he meant that it is sealed? A cooling system where all the liquid stays in a sealed environment is a closed loop. The windshield washing system is the exact opposite.
Again sounds like another Karma Automotive BS .
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I get that the bigger tank would help, but I don't understand how they can make the windshield washing system, whose specific purpose is to spray water out the tank, into a closed loop. That's like saying that the faucet in your kitchen is part of a closed loop. Maybe he meant that it is sealed? A cooling system where all the liquid stays in a sealed environment is a closed loop. The windshield washing system is the exact opposite.
Maybe he was talking about the fuel system and I misquoted. He said it was a bigger tank and evaporation wasn't an issue. The why and how I don't recall, maybe something about the heat off this engine wasn't displaced the same IDK.
 
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