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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a garage to park it, but then I cannot take advantage of the solar panel on the roof as there is only a small window at the side of the garage.

I could get a glass garage built and leave the windows of the Fisker open?

What are your thoughts? Or is it fine to store the Fisker in total blackness so long as you drive it once a month?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So you mean put a walmart solar panel on the garage and hook it up to the 12 volt battery on the Fisker?
 

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Trickle Charger

So you mean put a walmart solar panel on the garage and hook it up to the 12 volt battery on the Fisker?
@grundoon - he is talking about using a small battery trickle charger. See this post for a model recommended often by HarleyGuy:

http://www.fiskerbuzz.com/forums/14...torage-charging-using-power-supply-input.html

If you use the Search feature, there are many threads that discuss the how/when/why of using a trickle charger, as well as how to install the pigtails from the trickle charger onto your battery and engine block. Or you can have someone install it for you (like Lormax did for me). The pigtails allow you to simply plug in the trickle charger when you need it, and then leave the pigtails in the engine compartment when not in use.

Good luck!
 

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Doesn't the solar panel only charge the 12v battery rather than the drive batteries in the Karma? I think that being the case I wouldn't worry about it unless you're not going anywhere for long periods of time. Then if needed hook up to a trickle charger.
 

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@DHH - you are correct that the solar panel charges the 12V battery. However @grundoon asked whether it's OK to drive it once a month (implying that the 12V will only be charged during those rare drives).

To me, a month in between drives is risky to not have your 12V on a trickle charger...and mostly because replacing the 12V is not a simple task. Plus, moving the car once the 12V is dead can require towing assistance, so the trickle charger is a small price to pay to avoid a dead 12V battery.

There are many members who live in cold climates and have parked their cars for the winter. So the trickle charger is important in those cases. Some of them can speak first hand to the hassle of dealing with a dead 12V.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well if it didn't start after a month, couldn't I just push it out of the garage into the sun and then it would charge up after a day?
 

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Well if it didn't start after a month, couldn't I just push it out of the garage into the sun and then it would charge up after a day?
Wait for the experts to respond , but IMHO , no! :angel:
It would be a lot easier to set up a charger than to push a 5300 Lb. dead Karma out of a garage. Also, based on the experience of some of the forum members, in some cases, a dead 12V battery cannot be revived by charging alone, and removing and replacing the battery is a non-trivial procedure, due to lack of access.

So unless you plan to suspend grow lamps over the Karma to power the Solar Panels, which may lead to other complications, the trickle charger is the way to go.
 

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I think I'm missing something - why not just use a $25 trickle charger from Sears or somewhere ?

If you really want something cool and different then a retractable roof during daylight hours would be really cool and best vs. a skylight. Some glass limits the output of solar panels due to decreased photometric transmission and my not charge your battery even with the skylight.

Placing solar panels behind windows will cost you quite a bit of energy...

From the iron content of standard glass (which blocks some light), to Low-E glass which blocks some more light, to the extra reflections from additional air/glass interfaces--you will lose a lot of power (50% or more????).

Here is an example of how glass interferes with a solar cell's spectral response.

The simple test... Take any silicon solar panel (big or small) and connect it to a DVM set amps. The amp reading in sun and behind glass will give you a very exact reading on how much power you will lose (the current output of a shorted silicon solar panel is proportional to the amount of sunlight energy hitting the panel).

You also need to take into account that fact that most people's windows are near 90 degrees (vertical). And for much of North America, the ideal angles are closer to 20-40 degrees. Only in winter (and farther towards the north) does running a panel vertical not hurt you (and in some cases may help increase power collected during the winter months).



I would play it safe and buy one from Sears or somewhere.

http://www.sears.com/diehard-batter...p-02871219000P?prdNo=1&blockNo=1&blockType=G1
 

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Or you could just pull 12 and plug it back in when you are ready to drive the vehicle. Much quicker and cleaner than wiring up a trickle charger.
 

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Without a doubt I would park inside if I had the luxury of a garage. Parking outside puts a lot of wear and tear on both the exterior and mechanical (one example being the documented issues with rainwater damaging the CIU). I'll be surprised if you get any votes for "outside".
 

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Or you could just pull 12 and plug it back in when you are ready to drive the vehicle. Much quicker and cleaner than wiring up a trickle charger.
The easiest way to do that is to do the first half of a hard reset, and leave the connectors disconnected. That will cut off the 12V power and basically turn the car completely off. When you are ready to start up again, just reconnect the two connectors. You will have to re-calibrate the parking brake after you restart the car, but that's pretty easy.
 
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