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Thought about the Model X as my first Tesla purchase, but given its now realistically not ready for delivery until early 2015, will have to consider alternatives.

http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/12/tesla-model-x-production-wont-start-until-late-2014/

(emphasis added)

Tesla Model X Production Won’t Start Until Late 2014

By BRADLEY BERMAN

Paul Sancya/Associated Press

The Tesla Model X at the 2013 Detroit auto show.

Tesla Motors has confirmed that production of its all-wheel-drive Model X electric crossover will begin in late 2014, a year later than the company had originally announced. The revised timing was described in the company’s Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission last Thursday.

When Tesla first revealed the Model X in February 2012, the company said production would begin at the end of 2013, with deliveries following in 2014. Nearly a year later, at the Detroit auto show last January, Elon Musk, Tesla’s chief executive, made the first public statement about the shift in the schedule. Mr. Musk said production of the Model X would begin in the second half of 2014, according to Reuters.

While Tesla has been saying since the Detroit auto show in January that Model X production would begin in 2014, “our recent 10-K was the first written verification of that,” Shanna Hendricks, a Tesla spokeswoman, said in an e-mail.

“I almost have trouble calling this a delay in Model X, because that makes it sound like we’ve run into problems with Model X, and it’s taking longer than we thought, and it’s out of our control,” Ms. Hendricks wrote. “When, really, we’re consciously pushing back timing to allow ourselves to focus on its production and product enhancements in Model S.”

While Tesla did encounter production delays and problems with its first car, the Roadster, deliveries of the first Tesla Model S sedans were made in early June 2012, a few weeks earlier than originally projected. But in the first few months of Model S production, the company fell short of its own targets, delivering only about 250 cars. By the end of last year, the pace had picked up.

Converting customers with reservations into actual deliveries is critical for the company’s financial health. Tesla reported a fourth-quarter net loss of $81.5 million but says it expects to be profitable sometime in 2013. “We are very focused on achieving profitability and maintaining that profitability,” Ms. Hendricks said.

Tesla has not started putting alpha or beta versions of the Model X on the road for testing, Ms. Hendricks said. Tesla is “still finalizing the design prototype that has been on display at both Detroit and Geneva motor shows,” she wrote. The crossover’s most prominent design feature is the use of “falcon doors,” which are hinged at the top and rise like wings.

The Model X is built on the same platform as the Model S sedan. Tesla’s 10-K document provides this description of the Model X: “This unique vehicle has been designed to fill the niche between the roominess of a minivan and the style of an S.U.V., while having high-performance features such as a dual-motor all-wheel-drive system.”

Reservations for the standard Model X require a $5,000 deposit, while the Signature version requires a $40,000 deposit.

Prices for the Model X have not been announced. Tesla’s 10-K document states: “We anticipate that we will make Model X available with 60 kWh and 85 kWh battery pack options, with pricing of each version similar to those of a comparably equipped Model S.” Prices for the Model S sedan include a standard 60-kilowatt-hour version for $69,900 and an 85-kilowatt-hour model for $79,900. Many buyers are eligible for a $7,500 federal tax credit.

The company continues to state Model X production targets of 10,000 to 15,000 cars a year. There is still some wiggle room on the actual start of production with Mr. Musk stating “the second half of 2014” at the Detroit auto show while the S.E.C. documents state “late 2014.” Tesla’s Web site simply says, “Deliveries begin 2014.”
 

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What are the alternatives though? I guess it depends on why you were buying one. If one were looking for efficiency, there are lots of "green" crossovers. Performance? Cayenne Turbo, space? Well, I guess a minivan haha.

I'm also disappointed, but if the X came off the line and the car and process was as problematic as the S was at launch, I don't think I'd want it anyway.
 

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What are the alternatives though? I guess it depends on why you were buying one. If one were looking for efficiency, there are lots of "green" crossovers. Performance? Cayenne Turbo, space? Well, I guess a minivan haha.

I'm also disappointed, but if the X came off the line and the car and process was as problematic as the S was at launch, I don't think I'd want it anyway.
I've always been an SUV guy and will likely need one in the next 2 years - was looking forward to adding the X, but may have to opt for something in the interim - Karma not great for trips to Big Bear or Tahoe (nor would I want to bring it up there!)

And now with Fisker likely out of the mix for a while, will be unlikely to see an attractively styled eco-SUV (oxymoronic as it sounds). Perhaps we'll never see the designs or mockup of the Fisker SUV design though we know it exists (confirmed by several people and I saw it under tarp during the design studio tour in Anaheim).
 

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I've always been an SUV guy and will likely need one in the next 2 years - was looking forward to adding the X, but may have to opt for something in the interim - Karma not great for trips to Big Bear or Tahoe (nor would I want to bring it up there!)

And now with Fisker likely out of the mix for a while, will be unlikely to see an attractively styled eco-SUV (oxymoronic as it sounds). Perhaps we'll never see the designs or mockup of the Fisker SUV design though we know it exists (confirmed by several people and I saw it under tarp during the design studio tour in Anaheim).
http://www.viamotors.com/lineup/
Reserve your E-REV truck with a Fully Refundable Deposit. Fleet Deliveries now in progress. Consumer deliveries planned for 2013.
 

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http://www.viamotors.com/lineup/
Reserve your E-REV truck with a Fully Refundable Deposit. Fleet Deliveries now in progress. Consumer deliveries planned for 2013.
I spent some time talking to one of the co-founders of VIA at a local EV expo last spring. It is a very cool implementation, with a Karma-like drivetrain consisting of a V6 motor/generator, 24kwh Li-ion battery pack and a 400hp electric motor, with an all-electric range up to 40 miles. Initial target markets are fleets and construction.
 

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I spent some time talking to one of the co-founders of VIA at a local EV expo last spring. It is a very cool implementation, with a Karma-like drivetrain consisting of a V6 motor/generator, 24kwh Li-ion battery pack and a 400hp electric motor, with an all-electric range up to 40 miles. Initial target markets are fleets and construction.
I'd be very interested in this as a consumer. The thing is they are quite elusive on the website about towing capacity. Although the powertrain sounds nearly identical in concept and raw HP to the Karma - the torque looks to be substantially less at a puny 300 ft/lbs. When it comes to towing, the most important spec is torque - so it's rather baffling why they would not tout the towing capacity (unless it sucks). Anyway, I'd trade my Navigator in a friggin' heartbeat for a full size pickup that could tow 10,000 lbs minimum (and has an EV-ER power train).
 

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EX:Shadow/Canyon #324
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I'd be very interested in this as a consumer. The thing is they are quite elusive on the website about towing capacity. Although the powertrain sounds nearly identical in concept and raw HP to the Karma - the torque looks to be substantially less at a puny 300 ft/lbs. When it comes to towing, the most important spec is torque - so it's rather baffling why they would not tout the towing capacity (unless it sucks). Anyway, I'd trade my Navigator in a friggin' heartbeat for a full size pickup that could tow 10,000 lbs minimum (and has an EV-ER power train).
I don't think towing capacity is important to their target market of fleets and contractors.
 

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I've always been an SUV guy and will likely need one in the next 2 years - was looking forward to adding the X, but may have to opt for something in the interim - Karma not great for trips to Big Bear or Tahoe (nor would I want to bring it up there!)

And now with Fisker likely out of the mix for a while, will be unlikely to see an attractively styled eco-SUV (oxymoronic as it sounds). Perhaps we'll never see the designs or mockup of the Fisker SUV design though we know it exists (confirmed by several people and I saw it under tarp during the design studio tour in Anaheim).
There is an SUV with a Tesla power train that you can buy right now (relatively cheaply after all the different rebates) which may work for you until the Model X hits:



I have driven one and it drives well, but it cannot tow a house or seat 17 like the mammoth SUVs such as the Navigator or the Expedition. Depending on what you need, this may be the ticket. Click on the photo above for Toyota's RAV4E website.
 

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There is an SUV with a Tesla power train that you can buy right now (relatively cheaply after all the different rebates) which may work for you until the Model X hits:



I have driven one and it drives well, but it cannot tow a house or seat 17 like the mammoth SUVs such as the Navigator or the Expedition. Depending on what you need, this may be the ticket. Click on the photo above for Toyota's RAV4E website.
You could pick one of these up for like 30-35k late last year. A lot of car for the money
 

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There is an SUV with a Tesla power train that you can buy right now (relatively cheaply after all the different rebates) which may work for you until the Model X hits:



I have driven one and it drives well, but it cannot tow a house or seat 17 like the mammoth SUVs such as the Navigator or the Expedition. Depending on what you need, this may be the ticket. Click on the photo above for Toyota's RAV4E website.
Thanks for the link Fab but this won't cut the mustard with my towing requirements. :) I'm looking forward to the day that there is a nice eco-friendly option though.
 

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I don't think towing capacity is important to their target market of fleets and contractors.
Right. I'm sure their target market (for 3 pickups, a cargo van and a full-sized SUV) is more interested in how much space there is for company logos or decals. Silly me.
 

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There is an SUV with a Tesla power train that you can buy right now (relatively cheaply after all the different rebates) which may work for you until the Model X hits:

I have driven one and it drives well, but it cannot tow a house or seat 17 like the mammoth SUVs such as the Navigator or the Expedition. Depending on what you need, this may be the ticket. Click on the photo above for Toyota's RAV4E website.
I question the practicality of an SUV that has a 103 mile range.
 

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Right. I'm sure their target market (for 3 pickups, a cargo van and a full-sized SUV) is more interested in how much space there is for company logos or decals. Silly me.
Actually, I applaud them as a startup for picking a target market and developing and positioning their products for that market. Note that you can only get your VIA modified Suburban in two colors: black or white. No problem for businesses, but not the choices that consumers want.
 

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I question the practicality of an SUV that has a 103 mile range.
Unless battery improvements come, the x probably won't be doing all that much better. I think elon mentioned 10% loss vs similar S, so I can see 190 instead of 210 miles, and the way I drive more likely 160.

With a big supercharger rollout it might not matter though as that's still 2+ hours of driving and they're planning for 120 miles apart.
 

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With a big supercharger rollout it might not matter though as that's still 2+ hours of driving and they're planning for 120 miles apart.
So that means drive for 2 hours, charge for an hour, drive for 2 hours, charge for an hour, etc. A very leisurely way to take a road trip. :dodgy:
 

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So that means drive for 2 hours, charge for an hour, drive for 2 hours, charge for an hour, etc. A very leisurely way to take a road trip. :dodgy:
Well, depends on your usage. I've no plans to take roadtrips so that issue of EVs never bothered me, but I do make 180-200 mile drives sometimes so it would be good to have a way to refuel relatively quickly.

Btw, 180 miles would be 3 hours of driving
 

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There will probably be other alternatives by the time the Model X comes out. I know GM is working on a Volt based SUV.

From what I gather; the Model X is geared towards the soccer mom. A blurb from their website:

Model X is designed from the ground up to blend the best of an SUV with the benefits of a minivan, as only an electric car can. It is an automobile above category, built around the driver—and six of her friends. It artfully provides unfettered performance and brilliant functionality.

I am not sure if towing etc was a major consideration during the design process of the Model X. Think of it is as a box to put stuff in rather than a versatile SUV (i.e. will probably lack towing, off road etc capabilities).
 
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