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Hopefully this is a very rare occurrence for Tesla or any other EVs. Very bad PR if it's widely publicized.

I even hesitate showing this article to my wife. We just returned from a 200+ mile New Years trip in our Karma (including charging it overnight), and she remarked how wonderful, efficient and comfortable the car is. She was sitting in it while I was getting our luggage out of the room and people were walking around taking photos.
 

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How many gasoline cars burn a day? How many electric blankets? It shouldn't happen, but it also shouldn't be a "big story" if it does ... once.
 

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Since aluminum melts at 1221 degrees F and lithium ignites (or explodes) at 932 degrees F, the actual temperature of the Tesla battery fire must have been way hotter than 1221 F.

Strange that the aluminum melted but the tires didn’t.

A friend sent me this article which seems at odds with the common wisdom of not using water to douse a Li-Ion battery fire. More specifically, it's at odds with the warning in the Karma Owner's Handbook (p.1.3) that states: "If a vehicle fire occurs, extinguish it with a Class D powder-type extinguisher."

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/safety_concerns_with_li_ion


What's confusing to me is the article's instructions on how to handle a lithium-Ion battery fire vs. a lithium-metal battery fire:

"Lithium-ion batteries contain little lithium metal and in case of a fire they can be dowsed with water. Only lithium-metal batteries require a Class D extinguisher."

Another issue is even if you carry a Class D extinguisher, are you going to actually stand there and try to put a battery fire out? Or would you run like h***?
 
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