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I didn't buy my Fisker to be environmentally friendly, but for the looks, low end torque and fun in quiet comfort.

According to below, maybe a Hummer would have been better? ;)

http://news.thomasnet.com/green_clean/2012/06/21/book-hybrid-electric-vehicles-are-no-better-than-regular-cars/
 

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This "Green Illusions" book contradicts reports I've read from Union of Concerned Scientists, e.g.:

http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_vehicles/smart-transportation-solutions/advanced-vehicle-technologies/electric-cars/emissions-and-charging-costs-electric-cars.html

http://www.ucsusa.org/assets/images/cv/electric-cars-charging-costs-savings-fact-3.jpg

I think the author has an agenda: he wants everybody to ride bicycles. It's true that would provide lots of further systematic savings than just improved fuel economy, but I don't think a significant number of people will give up the auto-based lifestyle unless fuel prices REALLY skyrocket.
 

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I think several countries in Europe are positioned for people to transition into EV better than the U.S.. I think they have invested more in terms of infrastructure and have made tax incentives and reduced duties on EV to make them more attractive to people. Plus, gas at $8 per gallon helps a lot to convince people.
I think the U.S. market is huge, but the transition will take longer here because of our cheap gas. But, as Pythagoras suggested, once gas hits north of $5 per gallon, people will look for alternatives in droves.
 

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Sigurd said:
I think several countries in Europe are positioned for people to transition into EV better than the U.S.. I think they have invested more in terms of infrastructure and have made tax incentives and reduced duties on EV to make them more attractive to people. Plus, gas at $8 per gallon helps a lot to convince people.
I think the U.S. market is huge, but the transition will take longer here because of our cheap gas. But, as Pythagoras suggested, once gas hits north of $5 per gallon, people will look for alternatives in droves.
Isn't it amazing how every time gas gets near $5.00/gallon it magically falls back in price? We are experiencing it again right now. Gasoline prices reached $4.00+ in February, and everyone was predicting $5.00 for the summer driving season. Now we are well below $4.00 (except in certain parts of CA), even though we have entered the peak driving season.

My theory:
1) When prices get over $4.00, consumers change their behavior and demand gets reduced
2) Gas prices over $4.00 (and oil north of $100/bbl) reduces overall economic growth, further shrinking demand
3) Possibly the oil companies know that $5.00 is the magic number for consumers switching to EVs, and don't want that to happen. The February gasoline price spike resulted in higher sales for Volt and Leaf, for example.
 

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dennis said:
Sigurd said:
I think several countries in Europe are positioned for people to transition into EV better than the U.S.. I think they have invested more in terms of infrastructure and have made tax incentives and reduced duties on EV to make them more attractive to people. Plus, gas at $8 per gallon helps a lot to convince people.
I think the U.S. market is huge, but the transition will take longer here because of our cheap gas. But, as Pythagoras suggested, once gas hits north of $5 per gallon, people will look for alternatives in droves.
Isn't it amazing how every time gas gets near $5.00/gallon it magically falls back in price? We are experiencing it again right now. Gasoline prices reached $4.00+ in February, and everyone was predicting $5.00 for the summer driving season. Now we are well below $4.00 (except in certain parts of CA), even though we have entered the peak driving season.

My theory:
1) When prices get over $4.00, consumers change their behavior and demand gets reduced
2) Gas prices over $4.00 (and oil north of $100/bbl) reduces overall economic growth, further shrinking demand
3) Possibly the oil companies know that $5.00 is the magic number for consumers switching to EVs, and don't want that to happen. The February gasoline price spike resulted in higher sales for Volt and Leaf, for example.
This gasbuddy 7 yr chart is interesting to see patterns of crude vs gas prices.
http://www.GasBuddy.com/gb_retail_price_chart.aspx?city1=USA Average&city2=&city3=&crude=y&tme=84&units=us

Related to other countries being more agressive than the USA check out the Netherland thread and insights (Statik is an author at insideevs.com) :
May-2012-Netherlands-358-Opel-AMPERA
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?14572-May-2012-Netherlands-358-Opel-AMPERA
 
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