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Not here to compare. I love them both for different reasons.
I am no expert but the non-Tesla car looks a lot like a Bentley, which is a nice enough car, but very different from a Karma. :)
 

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Your not the only dual car owner my buddy Joe also has both cars
Our good friend @dennis was a dual owner for a while, until he sold the wrong car and ended up as a Tesla-only owner. But part of being a good friend is to be able to forgive such errors in judgement. :)
 

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EX:Shadow/Canyon #324
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Our good friend @dennis was a dual owner for a while, until he sold the wrong car and ended up as a Tesla-only owner. But part of being a good friend is to be able to forgive such errors in judgement. :)
Well, let me think about that decision process...warranty, 0-60 in 4.2 seconds, 200+ miles on a charge, real back seat and trunk...now I remember why. :idea:
 

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I also have both. I love both cars, but prefer the Fisker when I have a choice between the two. We had a Honda minivan which I sold when I realized that the Tesla S could transport to the airport all of our gear for our ski vacation.
 

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Well, let me think about that decision process...warranty, 0-60 in 4.2 seconds, 200+ miles on a charge, real back seat and trunk...now I remember why. :idea:
Fanboy alert! LOL. It's ok Dennis, we still like you, even if you drive an electric wagon :)
 

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I think fanboy is a bit too dismissive here. If you track Dennis's posts, you'll see he was a gradual convert.
Indeed he was a gradual convert - 'fanboy' was a descriptor of his current status not the process through which he became one =)
 

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Well, let me think about that decision process...warranty, 0-60 in 4.2 seconds, 200+ miles on a charge, real back seat and trunk...now I remember why. :idea:
Well if you want to take a road trip good luck waiting in line for hours to get a charge. Great as a novelty not as a car when you need to get somewhere that is greater than its initial range on time.

Model S is not very useful after 200 miles or so as the Superchargers in the west are already overcapacity; if they came up with some sort of reservation system that guaranteed a charge once you got to the Supercharger that would be a lot more useful. Not many more worse feelings than being on a schedule and seeing 7 Model S' waiting to use the supercharger and being forced to wait in line to get topped up. Great idea in concept but not the holy grail. What ever happened to battery swaps? IMO the Model S is much more of a novelty than the Karma unless you don't go too far away from home or are never on a schedule. Rarely drive mine anymore.
 

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EX:Shadow/Canyon #324
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Well if you want to take a road trip good luck waiting in line for hours to get a charge. Great as a novelty not as a car when you need to get somewhere that is greater than its initial range on time.

Model S is not very useful after 200 miles or so as the Superchargers in the west are already overcapacity; if they came up with some sort of reservation system that guaranteed a charge once you got to the Supercharger that would be a lot more useful. Not many more worse feelings than being on a schedule and seeing 7 Model S' waiting to use the supercharger and being forced to wait in line to get topped up. Great idea in concept but not the holy grail. What ever happened to battery swaps? IMO the Model S is much more of a novelty than the Karma unless you don't go too far away from home or are never on a schedule. Rarely drive mine anymore.
I've been following this very closely and only places where there are capacity issues are Superchargers located in population centers such as Silicon Valley and LA that also need to be used by long distance travelers. You can see that in the usage graph in the bottom left corner of this photo of the live Supercharger Dashboard located in the Hawthorne lobby.




Tesla has been addressing this by putting in additional stalls (4->10 in Gilroy, 4->8 in Hawthorne, etc.) and by adding additional locations like San Juan Capistrano in Orange County that reduces demand for Hawthorne. The only time I waited was at Harris Ranch when there was only one charger; now there are 7.

They have also been building additional corridors in CA such as 101 S from the Bay Area to Santa Barbara with supercharger locations every 80-110 miles and I80 to Tahoe with Vacaville and Roseville online now and Rocklin and Truckee to be added later this year. There are currently about 90 Superchargers in the US going to more than 200 by the end of 2014.

So the Supercharger network and the Model S serve my needs for long distance travel in CA quite well. As always, Your mileage may vary.
 

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The "road trip" argument has always been something of a red herring, IMHO. I would guess that the number of road trips @dennis would have had to cancel if the Supercharger network did not exist (and he did not own other cars) would be very close to Zero. The idea that a car must be able to go on an impromptu extended road trip is a little like saying that all the shoes we buy should be equipped to connect to ski bindings because you may want to drop everything and go skiing on a whim at any moment, and your everyday shoes should double as ski boots.

Even without the Supercharger network, the Tesla S is a perfectly useable car for a vast majority of the time. For those exceptional occasions, it is just as easy to rent a car or use another transport option. This is not a new phenomenon, nor is it limited to electric cars. When I owned my first Jaguar XJ, I used to rent an SUV for road trips because the Jag was not particularly comfortable for long drives, and had a distressing habit of turning itself off at the most inconvenient places during a long trip. It worked just fine as an everyday car, however. I owned that car for 7 years and my brother bought it from me and used for another 3. Neither one of us thought that it was not a practical car because you could not just jump in and head to Tahoe in it.
 

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I would much rather drive somewhere on a whim because I truly enjoy to the driving experience in a satisfying car. When driving the Model S you have to really watch how fast you are going, how much AC you are using and other consumption items when road tripping. For me it takes away from the whole experience.

In sprawling metro areas like Southern California road trips are part of the culture; going to Palm Springs for a day etc or the like is quite common and tests the Model S' range. Not very fun to take an impromptu (really has to be planned in a pure EV for required top up stops) road trip that takes 50% more time and come back in the same day! Also having to take a predetermined route sort of takes away from it. I am not a fan of renting cars, the ones that are any fun to drive are expensive to rent and you have to pre-plan it all. Might as well fly in and then rent a car at your destination rather than do a road trip.

I was speaking to the person who is in charge of supercharger deployment a few months ago and the interesting piece of information that she told me is that the heaviest users of Superchargers are either locals or taxi cab operators/companies. So not as many people are taking Roadies as one would think in Model S'. It is more or less a marketing campaign.
 
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