Fisker Buzz Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Fisker Detail Shop
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just finished detailing a Fisker Karma today for one of the lawyers of Fisker. We used to be the detail shop that maintained the 30+ Karma's for the R&D department and saw a LOT of cars. It helps to be directly across the street from the HQ when they moved to Anaheim Hills.

Is it permissible to post writeups of some of our work? I don't want to break any forum rules.

Here are a couple of pix.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
I am pretty sure you have to pay auto guide to be a sponsor. I think it's pretty funny that your pics are copyrighted with Richard Lin....


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

·
Fisker Detail Shop
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I've always used my personal name to copyright pix instead of my company name as some forums will permit detailers to post their work and won't constitute advertising. Not exactly sure why you think that's "funny".

I'm only posting this example because the owner, who is or was one of Fisker's lawyers thought it would be a good idea to show other Karma owners what we can still do for their cars as we have the most experience working on them.

If this thread needs to be deleted, that's fine.

Richard
I am pretty sure you have to pay auto guide to be a sponsor. I think it's pretty funny that your pics are copyrighted with Richard Lin....


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

·
Fisker Detail Shop
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
Nice work. Thanks for posting the pictures. Kind of makes me want to detail my Karma.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,659 Posts
As long as we have a detailing expert on the forum, I would like to ask a question. About a week ago, when I as backing my car into a tight parking spot, a wayward column jumped out from behind another column and caused me to make contact with it. Fortunately I was creeping at extremely slow speed at the time and there was no damage. But I did pick up some paint from the column, which ran off by the way. What I would like to do is safely, and without damaging the paint underneath, remove the paint I picked up from the hit-and-run column.

What's the safest way to do that? I tried using a wet paper towel, and it helped, but I am concerned about leaving scrape marks on the car's paint. Here is a picture so that you can see what I am talking about. Any advice would be appreciated.

 

·
Owner #1926
Joined
·
113 Posts
so ... will that work on hard water spots as well?

When I first got my Karma, I used scratch-X on it, on a few choice locations to see how it would work - BAAAAAD idea! swirl marks galore! So I ended up spending a pretty penny on a professional detailing (who educated me that the Karma's paint is softer than most cars). But a few short weeks later, some very sneaky sprinkler systems got my Karma mid-day, dried on thre real good so I can't get rid of them. But since the scratch-X debacle, I'm paranoid to try anything .... so, regular old wax???
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
@Fabulist, try a little mild rubbing compound. That is what I always use, followed by some carnuba wax. That's my dentist recommendation to my lawyer friend. I think Harleyguy will give you a professional detailer's recipe, so I'm eagerly waiting for it.
 

·
Fisker Detail Shop
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Thanks Sigurd. If you're interested, I can post more pix of this Karma and other ones we have detailed.
Nice work. Thanks for posting the pictures. Kind of makes me want to detail my Karma.
Whenever we hit objects with our cars, there are two issues at hand to contend with. First thing to do is determine how much damage is really there and how much is transfer. Transfer is the material of the object you have hit that rubbed off onto the paint. If you hit a white wall, you can expect to find white paint on your car. Once that transfer is removed which can be done with clay, mild solvents, or even some polishing, the next step is to determine just how much the impact affected the clear coat.

I always recommend customers to stay away from rubbing compounds as they are not intended to be used with today's modern clearcoats. Some people confuse the term "rubbing compound" with "polishing compound".

Meguiar's Scratch-X is a hand applied polish that can remove very light clear coat scratches but the problem is most people don't know how to define what a scratch really is.

There are light clear coat scratches that can be buffed out and there are scratches that go clear through the paint that need to be painted. This is why the initial analysis is so important.

My goal is always to fix what can be fixed through subtractive methods. Clean, polish, compound as needed, wet sand if needed then add paint.

Here is an example of common damage on the Karmas that I repaired through a combination of polishing and applying factory touchup paint.


Based on your photo, I think it's going to need some paint but it's still hard to tell. One tip that I can pass on is that if you apply water or some media reducer to the damaged area and it turns black (the damage seems to disappear for a bit until the reducer evaporates) then you have a chance at polishing it out. If not, it's too deep to be polished and needs paint. I always find it interesting that people will suggest on forums to just use some wax or polish to fix something when the problem has not even been diagnosed yet.

As long as we have a detailing expert on the forum, I would like to ask a question. About a week ago, when I as backing my car into a tight parking spot, a wayward column jumped out from behind another column and caused me to make contact with it. Fortunately I was creeping at extremely slow speed at the time and there was no damage. But I did pick up some paint from the column, which ran off by the way. What I would like to do is safely, and without damaging the paint underneath, remove the paint I picked up from the hit-and-run column.

What's the safest way to do that? I tried using a wet paper towel, and it helped, but I am concerned about leaving scrape marks on the car's paint. Here is a picture so that you can see what I am talking about. Any advice would be appreciated.

 

·
Fisker Detail Shop
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here are some paint reading thicknesses on one Karma...compared to other manufacturers, it's an "average" thickness similar to BMW paint which ranges from 4-5 mil. The thickest factory paints can be found on Lexus' and the thinnest are on Subaru's.


In some cases we got really thin readings as well


Unfortunately most of the Karmas that came to us looked like this to begin with



These are rotary buffer trails and overly aggressive polishing on relatively soft paint. We were never given enough time to correct these however for press events, etc.. In this case, we only had two hours to make the most improvement which really needed 8 to 10 hours.

This is what I call an evaluation spot where I tape off an area and correct on one side so the BEFORE state can be compared. The AFTER state is on the left if you can't tell.


Here is another example of that 50/50 process. The BEFORE state is noticeably more dull and hazy. The left side has been corrected but not finished yet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
484 Posts
I also recommend staying away from rubbing compound, but regular wax like turtle will not damage yor paint or clear coat, but with some hand rubbing will remove the paint from the column you touched.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Let me start by saying i am a total amateur at detailing but I enjoy it. I have been using the polishing sytems by Adam's Pollishes with and orbital buffer. They have a variety of color coded polishes of different grades of abrasiveness. I am very happy with their products and they have some good "how To" videos on their website http://www.adamspolishes.com One thing I highly recommend is the "blow dryer" for the car. AIR FORCE MASTER BLASTER BY METROVAC I never have to take even a microfiber towel to the car to dry it.
 

·
Fisker Detail Shop
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
We are authorized installers for OptiCoat Pro as well as CQuartz Finest, two of the more popular ceramic resin coatings on the market. OptiCoat Pro when applied to properly prepped paint is stunning and there is almost no comparable protection on the market.

OptiCoat 2.0, the consumer version of OptiCoat is also very good but isn't as thick, as long lasting, or cures as fast as the Pro version.

Here is a 2005 Porsche Boxster we recently corrected and OptiCoated.

How it arrived.


How it looked after full correction and OptiCoat Pro


We have coated a LOT of Tesla's but I would think those pix are probably not welcome here, so I will show other cars.

Here is a Jet Black BMW that was fully corrected and coated with CQuartz Finest

BEFORE
50/50 BEFORE/AFTER


AFTER


This Charger underwent major corrective work after it got rained on by a neighbors sprinkler for 3 weeks while the owner was out of town and was going to have a repaint, but we saved the paint and coated it.




Have any of you tried opticoat? If so, what are your thoughts.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
I'm looking into paint film protection, such as xpel ultimate (discussed in another thread). What are your thoughts on doing an opticoat process first: is this a wasted effort (since it's going to be covered up with film) or is it essential in facilitating removal of the film years from now (just spoke to someone experienced in 3m films who said they could be a nightmare to remove, making removal more expensive than application).
 

·
Fisker Detail Shop
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
We always recommend to OptiCoat the paint first, do the film, and OptiCoat over the film as well. If you plan to remove the film in 3 to 5 years, you can probably get away from coating it first but in our experience of doing both OptiCoat and PPF, OC makes removal easier and safer for your paint.

We spent a week removing the film off a 10 year old AMG S55. The same happened to a 6 year old Audi. Film in good condition can be heated up and pulled off. Once it gets to a certain age, it leaves adhesive behind or shreds as you pull it and in the worst cases, pulls paint up. Most buyers of PPF don't know these risks.

Here is an Audi where the adhesive was left behind. During the removal process we tried heating it up with the sun, a heat gun, and a steamer, and nothing worked.

It came off in shreds




The best way to remove this was through physical means using a pin stripe removal wheel

As you can see from this 50/50 the paint was pretty torn up


The end result after correcting and OptiCoating but not applying film again




The bottom line is the right shop can remove the clear bra and save the paint but it can be very costly and time consuming and not to mention risky.

Richard

I'm looking into paint film protection, such as xpel ultimate (discussed in another thread). What are your thoughts on doing an opticoat process first: is this a wasted effort (since it's going to be covered up with film) or is it essential in facilitating removal of the film years from now (just spoke to someone experienced in 3m films who said they could be a nightmare to remove, making removal more expensive than application).
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top