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Hello group. Although no longer an owner, I thought I would update everyone on my battle with the IRS. After my accountant filed my tax return I received a letter from the IRS in May indicating that the $7.5 K electric vehical rebate claim was denied. My accountant appealed the decision and after several delays and me being forced to send in a check for almost $8 K (interest and penalties), I received a letter from the IRS indicating I would recieve a complete refund. So if any of you experience similar denials I advise you to appeal the decision.

Buck
 

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Hello group. Although no longer an owner, I thought I would update everyone on my battle with the IRS. After my accountant filed my tax return I received a letter from the IRS in May indicating that the $7.5 K electric vehical rebate claim was denied. My accountant appealed the decision and after several delays and me being forced to send in a check for almost $8 K (interest and penalties), I received a letter from the IRS indicating I would recieve a complete refund. So if any of you experience similar denials I advise you to appeal the decision.

Buck
Thanks for the update. Would it be possible to cite to your case if we have to appeal? Is there a decision number or citation that can be used by others?
 

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I don't know about Buck's case but many IRS appeals are settled informally. They never go to court so there is know court case to cite.

The IRS sends out millions of these letters every year denying tax credits and deductions. The individual or tax accountant respond by simply writing a letter explaining why you disagree, attaching supporting documents and usually if you are right the IRS issues a corrections.

I have never once had the IRS deny a credit or deduction that a client was entitled too and had the proper documentation to support the claim. I have always won these cases.

If the client does not have the necessary proof to support his credit or deduction and I feel strongly I can win the case I will cite the "Cohan Rule".

The Cohan Rule, as simply stated by a famous court case is that in absense of a person's documented proof the IRS may except a person's estimates of their expenses if they are reasonable and credible even If they don't have adequate records to support them.

Of course, I don't always win these cases.

Samuel
 
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