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If this approach actually works, we could lose the gas engines in EV/ER vehicles and just charge them as we drive.

-- Fab.
 

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You can't transfer enough energy inductively to an object in motion. If you wanna go this route just put a permanent magnet in the car and let the road alternate magnetic flux, i.e. just like a maglev train but with wheels. The infrastructure cost is too prohibitive. The ideal is to reduce infrastructure to the minimum viable amount. Just like getting rid of twisted pair phone lines and coaxial cable and going fiber everywhere.
 

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kabalah70 said:
You can't transfer enough energy inductively to an object in motion. If you wanna go this route just put a permanent magnet in the car and let the road alternate magnetic flux, i.e. just like a maglev train but with wheels. The infrastructure cost is too prohibitive. The ideal is to reduce infrastructure to the minimum viable amount. Just like getting rid of twisted pair phone lines and coaxial cable and going fiber everywhere.
Pretty much any new technology looks too expensive, impractical, and disruptive when it is proposed. There are a billion perfectly reasonable arguments why it is too expensive and impractical to plant a bunch low power transmit/receive towers that required serious computational capability to allow switching from one tower to another in order to provide radio communications rather than putting a few high-powered transmitters in a central location. But the strange and impractical alternative worked just fine. This is another one of these weird ideas that looks crazy to us, but may turn out to be as popular as cell phones. Just need to keep an open mind and not assume we know everything today.

-- Fab.
 

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Cell phones are an example of a technology that requires less infrastructure than its predessor, except for the fact that it piggybacks on the landline system. It is a simple matter of systems analysis, an inductive transfer system, even if the units only cost a penny a piece to produce, the labor would be rediculously expensive to maintain the road system. Unless you are waiting for completely roboticized road repair machines, but by then we could be flying around in anti-gravity flying machines that require no enroute infrastructure other than GPS satellites and a few WAAS ground stations at the various vertiports.[hr]
Or we could go the route that by the time inductive roads would be feasible, solar panel technology will achieve levels of efficiency that make inductive transfer obsolete in addition to increased battery capacity and other techs like electricity producing shock absorbers, etc. All of which is technology that is in the testing phase today.[hr]
Or we could go the route that by the time inductive roads would be feasible, solar panel technology will achieve levels of efficiency that make inductive transfer obsolete in addition to increased battery capacity and other techs like electricity producing shock absorbers, etc. All of which is technology that is in the testing phase today.
 

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I would be happy with any of those alternatives.

-- Fab.
 

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kabalah70 said:
You can't transfer enough energy inductively to an object in motion. If you wanna go this route just put a permanent magnet in the car and let the road alternate magnetic flux, i.e. just like a maglev train but with wheels. The infrastructure cost is too prohibitive. The ideal is to reduce infrastructure to the minimum viable amount. Just like getting rid of twisted pair phone lines and coaxial cable and going fiber everywhere.
Hello Guys, Past EV problems have all been sorted out. With UltraCapacitors instead of Batteries (almost instantaneous charging, far less weight and mass and far, far, cheaper), EVs have truly come of age. EVs need not be tiny and cramped, Australia's Holden Motors converted their full-sized 5.0 Litre V8 to EV with Untracapacitors instead of batteries and achieved a range of 80 Km. Using Inductive charging, this means keep going forever.

Also, a New Zealand company claims the cost of converting a normal road to Inductive (using a series of pads) will add only about 10% to the cost of a road. Belgium has already tried out a road with the system for buses and a Volvo sedan.

Using MagLev and Transmission Towers is impractical, will never work and is unnecessary. Inductive charging technology is available today, and is already at work.
 

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Not inductive, but gets the same result, as long as you only need to drive around San Francisco. I have always wondered if this is possible to do, and I guess it is. Click on the photo below for the full article.

 

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smells like april fool to me...
Of course it is. The electric motor on the Prius is not strong enough to move the car by itself at anything more than crawling speed. You almost always have to use the ICE, even if the car is connected to a 600V 400A source. Also, when disconnected, the Prius should be more than capable of operating on the onboard ICE, even in SF.


Besides, do you really think I am going to even consider bolting those ugly poles to the top of my Fisker? :D
 
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