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Put a deposit down yesterday on a used Fisker Ecosport. Seems like a great price, one owner, serviced by the dealership since purchase with a clean bill of health. Dealership seems on the up and up with disclosure. In fact, reminded me that there is no warranty and will have to be a cash transaction because of the difficulty financing a car which has a company that is out of business. I have several concerns...

1) For those that own, or have owned, do you LIKE the car?
2) Has the car been reliable?
3) How can you tell anything about the car with the VIN? (late model, etc.)
4) One of the used cars on the lot did not start and we could not even open the doors initially. The salesman stated that the battery was only showing 40% and that was the issue. My question is, how much battery do you need to start the car? Can it run on gas only from the start? Has anyone driven theirs long distance?

Basically, I test drove the Telsa, however, it is more expensive and the limit to only electricity in a state that is prone to hurricanes, loss of power, etc. scares me. The hope was that the Fisker was more versatile in that regard and obviously it is a much nicer looking car! So, honest Pros and Cons would be appreciated!
 

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Put a deposit down yesterday on a used Fisker Ecosport. Seems like a great price, one owner, serviced by the dealership since purchase with a clean bill of health. Dealership seems on the up and up with disclosure. In fact, reminded me that there is no warranty and will have to be a cash transaction because of the difficulty financing a car which has a company that is out of business. I have several concerns...

1) For those that own, or have owned, do you LIKE the car?
2) Has the car been reliable?
3) How can you tell anything about the car with the VIN? (late model, etc.)
4) One of the used cars on the lot did not start and we could not even open the doors initially. The salesman stated that the battery was only showing 40% and that was the issue. My question is, how much battery do you need to start the car? Can it run on gas only from the start? Has anyone driven theirs long distance?

Basically, I test drove the Telsa, however, it is more expensive and the limit to only electricity in a state that is prone to hurricanes, loss of power, etc. scares me. The hope was that the Fisker was more versatile in that regard and obviously it is a much nicer looking car! So, honest Pros and Cons would be appreciated!

@haredi Welcome to the Forum. You are asking all the right questions. Check out this post that will help you find some of that information in existing posts on the Forum.

Personally, my answer to your questions are:

1) I absolutely love my car. I am having serious Karma withdrawal since I have put mine in storage for the winter.

2) Mine suffered from some initial teething problems, but since a RDM replacement in early 2012, it has been (knocking on wood) absolutely reliable for 30K+ miles. You will find that the specific history of each car is more important than mileage or build date. In some cases, older cars with more miles are probably more reliable than newer cars.

3) See the link I posted above

4) The salesman had no idea what he was talking about. The Karma has two batteries, a conventional 12V automotive battery that powers all the electronics on the car, and the large 20KWH battery used for propulsion, usually called the HV (High Voltage) battery. The 12V conventional battery is the one that powers the remote lock and unlock system, so if you could not remotely unlock the car doors, it was the 12V battery that was flat and the HV battery's charge level makes absolutely no difference. The good news is that the Karma can be jump started from another battery if necessary, and the 12V battery is a lot cheaper to replace then the HV battery. To answer the original question, in normal operation, the HV battery does not allow itself to get below 15% so the chances of getting a completely dead HV battery by driving the car is very very small, and it is possible to drive the car using the gas engine (or ICE as we usually call it here) all the time, but that would defeat the purpose of having an EV.
 
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