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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i emailed them asking them why the fisker not on the list

http://energycenter.org/clean-vehicle-rebate-project


This the reply i got;
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Dear Sir,

Thank you for your e-mail. Fisker Karma's level of emissions is too high in order for it to become eligible for the CVRP rebate, as determined by the Air Resources Board. The car was certified as LEV (low-emission vehicle), the minimum emission standard allowed in California, which is insufficient to qualify for CVRP.

Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any further questions or concerns.

Michael Mikulewicz
Program Assistant, Transportation

California Center for Sustainable Energy
9325 Sky Park Court, Suite 100
San Diego, CA 92123-1502
858.634.4740 ext. 404 phone
858.244.1178 fax
Accelerating the transition to a sustainable world powered by clean energy



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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here is why the fisker will not qualify
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Dear Sir,

Below is a further explanation of the reasons why Fisker Karma is not eligible for the rebate.

California Air Resources Board (ARB) has three progressively more stringent tailpipe emission standards for light duty vehicles (passenger cars and light duty trucks) - low emission vehicle (LEV), ultra low emission vehicle (ULEV), and super-ultra low emission vehicle (SULEV). ARB further builds on the most stringent SULEV tailpipe standard:

. PZEV (partial zero emission vehicle; meaning it earns partial ZEV credit) = SULEV plus zero evaporative emissions plus a 15 year/150,000 mile warranty on the emissions system

. AT PZEV = PZEV plus advanced technology components such as a hybrid drive train; AT PZEVs must meet the PZEV emissions warranty requirement and additionally warrant the traction battery for 10 years/150,000 miles

. Enhanced AT PZEV = AT PZEV plus the ability to add energy from an external source such as the electric grid

A plug-in hybrid electric vehicle such as the Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid, Chevy Volt, or Fisker Karma would be considered an Enhanced AT PZEV if it met the AT PZEV requirements. As an Enhanced AT PZEV, it would then be eligible to receive rebates from ARB's Clean Vehicle Rebate Project (CVRP).

Toyota met the Enhanced AT PZEV requirement from the beginning. Chevy certified their 2011 Volt to an ULEV emission standard. It additionally did not provide the PZEV/AT PZEV warranty. Thus, the 2011 Volt was not eligible for CVRP rebates. See a media discussion here: http://www.plugincars.com/why-chevy-volt-does-not-qualify-california-5000-rebate-49725.html However, the 2012 model year Volt was certified to the SULEV tailpipe standards and did meet the zero evaporative emission and warranty requirements and thus met the Enhanced AT PZEV requirements. Thus, it was added to CVRP's list of eligible vehicle models.

That brings us to the Fisker Karma. Fisker certified the 2012 Karma to the dirtiest allowable light duty vehicle emission standard - LEV. As an aside, the certification was also conditional as Fisker's OBD system had a significant number of deficiencies. This is all discussed in the executive order for the 2012 Fisker: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/onroad/cert/pcldtmdv/2012/fisker_pc_a4020001r1_2d0_l2_hevge.pdf. Had Fisker certified the Karma as a SULEV, and had they demonstrated zero evaporative emissions, and had they provided the prescribed extended exhaust and traction battery warranties, then they would have been certified as an Enhanced AT PZEV and they would have been eligible for a rebate from CVRP.
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One of the Forum members had already gone through this exercise in connection with single-occupant HOV lane access and got the same result. See this thread. Pretty much the same criteria and exactly the same result.

To be fair to Fisker, back in 2007 when this car was being designed, the goal was to find and use an available, proven and powerful enough engine to turn a 180KW generator that would fit in the space that was available. It was challenging enough to get an engine that would satisfy all the emissions requirements worldwide. Trying to satisfy state-by-state requirements for HOV lane access would have been a total nightmare, particularly when the standards probably did not even exist at the time. In fact, the Karma is eligible for HOV lane stickers in some states, Florida being one IIRC, but not California. Same principles apply to state-specific rebates that were not even in the picture in 2007. If the Karma production is restarted, the power train will undoubtedly evolve to take advantage of these types of incentives by using more modern and cleaner engines, or by changing the car's programming to run the engine more efficiently.
 

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Thanks for the additional detail. My understanding from FA employees is that the GM Ecotec engine that is used in the Karma for the range extender was not eligible to meet the SULEV requirements, regardless of the other conditions related to ARB's PZEV standards. Unfortunately, no other engine manufacturers in 2007-2008 were willing to provide FA with their engines (BMW included), so GM's old "dirty" 2008-vintage Ecotec was the only option available.

Incidentally, the BMW N20 which Fisker had contracted to buy for the Atlantic does meet SULEV requirements and it was intended that the Atlantic qualify for CVRP and carpool lane access.
 
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