Fisker Buzz Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I washed my EcoSport (Eclipse color) yesterday, and now I can see all these scratches that the dealership had covered up. Kinda irritating, but whatever :dodgy:

I went to the local body shop to see about buffing them out, and to kinda show off a little to the local enthusiasts. After wiping the drool from their chins, they said that fixing them shouldn't be a problem; they can buff the scratches out and add clearcoat, no problem.

But before I do that, I thought I'd better check with you guys! I remember the EcoChic had glass glitter in the paint, but there's nothing particularly unique about the EcoSport paint, is there?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,077 Posts
The paint is very unique it's a three stage paint base coat color mid coat glass top coat is clear . As a hobby I detail cars and I don't mean wash and wax. It's called paint correction some of my details can take the better part of 15 to 20 hours .
Rule of thumb if you can feel a scratch with your nail the scratch has broken though the clear coat . Buffing all day won't get rid of the scratch .
What can be done is the clear coat can be wet sanded that was soften the edges of the scratch making it less noticeable . I also have used a method another detailer wrote about using a tooth pick to apply paint building it up and wet sanding then leveling the paint .

Down side your car isn't a solid color . Anyway if the scratch isn't to bad it can be wet sanded then buffed out and hopefully the scratch will be less . Without seeing the car hard to tell . The trouble with what the body shop wants to and I disagree with them shooting clear coat after fixing the scratch tells me the scratch is deep and might of gone into the mid coat . If that's happened I don't know how the finished panel will look you very well might be able to notice it . I feel your taking a risk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't feel the scratches with my fingernail, but I can see them pretty clearly when the sun hits the car. The manager of the body shop said that it looked like someone tried to dry it using a towel, and left scratches all over it.

The thing is, these scratches are all over the car! Literally every panel has a scratch that I can see that's at least a foot long. One scratch on the driver's side starts at the front quarter panel, and goes all the way to the trunk.

I tried to take a picture, but the scratch doesn't show up in the pic. Unless the sun is on it, you really can't see them; it's just when the sun is on it that you can see the contrast of the scratch to the dark paint.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,077 Posts
If you don't feel it with your nail there is no need for any clear coat respray . If they mention re spraying clear coat don't let them do the work . You need to find a car detailer that knows how to do paint correction . Post where you are located and I will try and find one for you . The paint can be buffed out and if the body shop only uses a rotary buffer stay away . I very really use a rotary buffer anymore unless we wet sand .
I use a Rupes machine with some practice almost anyone can use it .The good thing is it'd hard to burn the paint if you use a rotary it's easy to burn the paint .

Check www.autogeek.net I buy a lot of products from them and also belong to the forum
 

·
Owner #1926
Joined
·
113 Posts
I had the same problem when I brought mine home - got it in the sun and it had so many fine scratches on it, it looked like it was covered in spider webs! Harley is right, find a good, professional detailer. I would only use someone who has a track record with luxury cars. My detailer said this car has unusually soft paint, so you need someone who will recognize that and be gentle with her. Paint correction and a coat of wax is all you need - no clear coat!
Then get some Eraser Spot Remover by 3D - amazing for those spots left by ninja sprinklers! Oh, and start a good washing regimen yourself if you are not well versed in it already - plenty of tips elsewhere on this site - microfiber cloths, dedicated bucket, top down washing, etc, etc.
Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,077 Posts
I had the same problem when I brought mine home - got it in the sun and it had so many fine scratches on it, it looked like it was covered in spider webs! Harley is right, find a good, professional detailer. I would only use someone who has a track record with luxury cars. My detailer said this car has unusually soft paint, so you need someone who will recognize that and be gentle with her. Paint correction and a coat of wax is all you need - no clear coat!
Then get some Eraser Spot Remover by 3D - amazing for those spots left by ninja sprinklers! Oh, and start a good washing regimen yourself if you are not well versed in it already - plenty of tips elsewhere on this site - microfiber cloths, dedicated bucket, top down washing, etc, etc.
Good luck!
This is where I buy some of my Microfiber towels it might surprise you .http://www.pakshak.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Admittedly, you guys have me a little nervous. I'm supposed to drop the car off tomorrow (Monday) evening, so they can work on it Tuesday and Wednesday.

The body shop is the local Chevrolet body shop. I've used them for years, and since they work on Corvette's and Cadillacs regularly then I figured this wouldn't be a challenge. But if the paint's that unique... well, I'm nervous. I don't want them to turn a series of minor scratches in to a major problem.

The estimated cost for fixing it was $200-250, with a maximum of 2 days of work. Does that sound unrealistic?

If so, then maybe I'd better cancel my appointment and see what Harleyguy can find. Harley, I'm in western North Carolina, in Wilkesboro (about halfway between Charlotte and Boone).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
The price is cheap. A proper paint correction by an experienced detailer is more expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, I took it to the body shop and spoke with the detailer for awhile about all of the notes in this thread, and some comments regarding a soft clear coat on the AutoGeek forum. In the end, he really wasn't comfortable working on it, either. He works on Vettes all the time, but his concern was that if he made a minor mistake and burnt the paint then repairing it could be a big deal.

It was his opinion that someone had tried to dry it with a chamois, and that chamois is what left scratches all over it. He could feel a few with his fingernail, so it's really worse that I originally thought.

I'll be honest, if I'd known that the paint was this sensitive, I might have second-guessed buying the car. Even after getting these scratches fixed, it's just not practical for me to have to take it several hundred miles to get it cleaned and waxed.

I'm starting to understand why people wrap or dip their cars now. Grrr.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
484 Posts
In the end, he really wasn't comfortable working on it, either.
Hi GoNC,
I have a black Karma as well. I have used regular Turtle paste wax for my light scratches. Don't use a mechanical buffer, just elbow grease and the pad it comes with. It may take a while, but the scratches will magically disappear. This will be my last black car, they clean for 1 day. Unfortunately, or fortunately... I can't ever see parting with it, so i'm thinking of wrapping it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My previous car was a black Solstice, but keeping it clean was a breeze. Being a convertible, the automatic wash wasn't an option, but I could go to the regular washing station (with the foaming brush) and just scrub it down, no problem.

Twice a year, I'd have her detailed at the local auto spa.

I had that car for 8 years, and hardly a scratch was on her. I really wish the Karma had the same paint job; yes, the paint on the Karma is gorgeous, but I'd give a little on the color for ease of maintenance.

I'm going to try your suggestion on one of the scratches near the bottom of the car, see how that works out. Wish me luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
The best thing I would recommend is detailing with an experienced paint restorer and placement of clear bra film. The film really eliminates swirls and minor scratches!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
FWIW, I saw some pics earlier of a car with the clear film you're talking about. After 4 or 5 years, though, it was completely baked in to the paint, and just destroyed the paint when they tried to remove it!

After seeing that and knowing to look for it, I've found numerous comments that you should take it off after 2-3 years and have a new one installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
OK, guys, now I'm asking for some advice.

I've started trying to remove these scratches myself, using Meguiar's Ultimate Compound and Meguiar's Liquid Wax.

So far, I'm only working on the driver's side pillar, where there are several shallow scratches (that I can't feel with my fingernail). I figured that any swirl marks I make from bad technique would be less noticeable here, and easier to fix.

After rubbing in the compound (with a microfiber pad) using a pretty firm hand pressure (no buffer), the scratches were fairly invisible, but I could still see the indention. This implies to me that after a few washes they're just going to show up again. I compounded by hand 4 times, but it never really got any better.

So, question 1: is this the best that I can expect by hand, or would more pressure help?

Question 2: If a pro uses an orbital buffer, could he (potentially) get them out permanently? Or would they still come back after a few washes unless they're sanded out?

Question 3: Am I correct that I still need to apply a coat of wax after using the compound? I know with regular paste compound I would, but after using this particular compound the car was already pretty shiny. I went ahead and applied a layer of wax to the pillar, but my next step is doing the whole car.

FWIW, this Liquid Wax is pretty darned awesome. I don't know about it's longevity yet, but it went on and came off like a breeze.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
484 Posts
Hi GoNC, I wouldn't use any type of compound on the paint. Most waxes have a very mild abrasive in them. i may be wrong, but rubbing compound is asking for trouble. Also i have no idea why, I found the less pressure the better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I still think it's best to leave it to a professional.
I totally agree, I just can't find a professional that's willing to touch it! I emailed the dealer twice, with no reply other than to get defensive and say it wasn't their fault (which confused me, since I didn't imply that it was).

I've gone to a few local places, and none of them have experience with this type of paint. They're all nervous about damaging it and having to pay to fix it, so they don't really want to touch it.

People have told me numerous times that there are "probably places in Charlotte that can handle it", but Charlotte (North Carolina) is a pretty big city (the 16th largest city in the US), so I have no idea where to even start.

I'm kinda getting in a position where I don't know what to do other than do it myself. I'm an inch away from having it sanded down and painted a regular GM black with a regular clearcoat; at least then it can be handled like any other car.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
I'm kinda getting in a position where I don't know what to do other than do it myself. I'm an inch away from having it sanded down and painted a regular GM black with a regular clearcoat; at least then it can be handled like any other car.
Well, then it's nothing to worry about. If they screw it up then have it repainted.;)
I really don't think our paint is that special or different from other paints. The chips might be in the clear coat instead of in the color coat, but it's still auto paint made by DuPont? If I were you, I'd go back to your Corvette dealer and talk him into doing his best for you. I bet you he knows what to do, but you might have made him worry because you might have seemed like more trouble than the job was worth so he bailed on you. I'm just guessing. Good luck with whatever you choose. I just feel bad for you because this is bothering you and you are spending a lot of time on this.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top