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Ya know, other than the 0-60, that's not too bad. It's priced nicely -- below the volt, with just under 4x the EV range and above the leaf, but not by much, and adding a useful 50 miles of range. It's not horrible looking either
 

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Ya know, other than the 0-60, that's not too bad. It's priced nicely -- below the volt, with just under 4x the EV range and above the leaf, but not by much, and adding a useful 50 miles of range. It's not horrible looking either
I agree with everything you said, except the part about it not being horrible looking. Looks like a frog who has just been shanked in prison. Not a good look.
 

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I think the i3 looks fine. It's like an X0.
 

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I agree with everything you said, except the part about it not being horrible looking. Looks like a frog who has just been shanked in prison. Not a good look.
Going to have to frame an amphibian, then set up his incarcerated demise before I can agree.

Seriously though, going by the leaf and some other funky things, it's not bad. Definitely better than that Mercedes B or whatever it was. Looks roomier than a Prius V as well.
 

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Had a chance to speak to my local dealer about this car and they were surprisingly informed about the i3. Long of the short is the range extender is not intended to be used frequently or for long distances- it is basically an emergency countermeasure to get to the next EV recharge station. This is kinda silly IMO you get the drawbacks of carrying around an ICE in an EV with none of the major benefits (i.e. driving normally until it is convenient to plug in again).
 

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i3 was the car we were planning to buy before the Karma became affordable, and I watched every update closely, but when I showed my wife the production spy shots, she changed her mind (concept car with all the glass on the door and hatch looked great, but much was lost along the way).

Now that we will have a charging station anyway, we are still considering trading my 2011 5-series for an i3, but I think I'll hold off on being among the first in line. The looks are really "like it or hate it".
 

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i3 was the car we were planning to buy before the Karma became affordable, and I watched every update closely, but when I showed my wife the production spy shots, she changed her mind (concept car with all the glass on the door and hatch looked great, but much was lost along the way).

Now that we will have a charging station anyway, we are still considering trading my 2011 5-series for an i3, but I think I'll hold off on being among the first in line. The looks are really "like it or hate it".
SAme here .. Except I bought a 5 Hybrid. Did not buy it to save the planet (I am doing that with the Fisker). Bought it to satisfy my engineering curiosity on how things work in real life as I do not believe much of what journalists think of the cars they drive. Love the car but I think the I3 is where the Electric car world will go for a few years until the infrastructure is ready for the Electric car. Drive just about everywhere and buy a 5,000 dollar ICE anxiety insurance if you need it. Tesla will not be far behind offering a similar option. It makes too much sense to ignore.
 

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SAme here .. Except I bought a 5 Hybrid. Did not buy it to save the planet (I am doing that with the Fisker). Bought it to satisfy my engineering curiosity on how things work in real life as I do not believe much of what journalists think of the cars they drive. Love the car but I think the I3 is where the Electric car world will go for a few years until the infrastructure is ready for the Electric car. Drive just about everywhere and buy a 5,000 dollar ICE anxiety insurance if you need it. Tesla will not be far behind offering a similar option. It makes too much sense to ignore.
I think the REx in the i3 will operate quite differently than the EVer in the Karma. For starters, it will only produce about 35hp, hardly enough to deliver the requisite power for acceleration (even for a 3,000lb car). I think it is really intended as a "limp home" mode since it will provide less than 100 miles of driving range (likely getting 33-42mpg based on some rumors in the European press - that is 80-100 miles of range with a 2.4 gallon tank).
 

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i3 was the car we were planning to buy before the Karma became affordable, and I watched every update closely, but when I showed my wife the production spy shots, she changed her mind (concept car with all the glass on the door and hatch looked great, but much was lost along the way).

Now that we will have a charging station anyway, we are still considering trading my 2011 5-series for an i3, but I think I'll hold off on being among the first in line. The looks are really "like it or hate it".
SAme here .. Except I bought a 5 Hybrid. Did not buy it to save the planet (I am doing that with the Fisker). Bought it to satisfy my engineering curiosity on how things work in real life as I do not believe much of what journalists think of the cars they drive. Love the car but I think the I3 is where the Electric car world will go for a few years until the infrastructure is ready for the Electric car. Drive just about everywhere and buy a 5,000 dollar ICE anxiety insurance if you need it. Tesla will not be far behind offering a similar option. It makes too much sense to ignore.
I know I keep harping about this, but a detachable, external Genset would give you the best of both worlds. You only take the weight penalty of the Genset when you really need it and the rest of the time you are driving a pure EV. One of the most elegant approaches to this is this design concept for the Fiat 500e. It includes extra batteries, a Genset and extra storage, just perfect for a road trip. There is no reason Tesla or other BEV makers cannot sell or even rent an external Genset for long trips as a third option to Supercharger and Battery swap.

 

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Pricing released... i3 will start at $41,350 in the US, before any federal or state incentives. In California, that drops the price to $31,350. The optional range extender adds a rumored $2-4K.

http://www.leftlanenews.com/bmw-i3.html
 

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I know I keep harping about this, but a detachable, external Genset would give you the best of both worlds. You only take the weight penalty of the Genset when you really need it and the rest of the time you are driving a pure EV. One of the most elegant approaches to this is this design concept for the Fiat 500e. It includes extra batteries, a Genset and extra storage, just perfect for a road trip. There is no reason Tesla or other BEV makers cannot sell or even rent an external Genset for long trips as a third option to Supercharger and Battery swap.

Except they look horrible! I would think the best solution would be something that fits in the Model S' frunk so that you don't have something ugly wagging at the back of a decent looking car. If Tesla thought of this sooner, this could be yet another Easter egg... with piping for exhaust already designed into the frunk.

Frankly, if there was a packaging solution to this, the EVer powertrain should be engineered to drop in/drop out (or slide in/slide out given the weight). That would give you the same benefits without the aesthetic penalty of the Fiat approach.
 

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Tesla will not be far behind offering a similar option. It makes too much sense to ignore.
While I like the idea of range extenders (and would welcome the option), Tesla is pretty set on being pure BEV. I can't see them offering a range-extended option. IMO they'd push dollars into bigger packs and/or quicker recharge times before diverting to an ICE.
 

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While I like the idea of range extenders (and would welcome the option), Tesla is pretty set on being pure BEV. I can't see them offering a range-extended option. IMO they'd push dollars into bigger packs and/or quicker recharge times before diverting to an ICE.
I think @smoothoperator mentioned that JB has/had a range extender trailer for his electrified porsche 944... so the interest has been there... now elon himself may have a differing view, but if the market wants it... there's always a chance.
 

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JB's trailer was interesting in that it was a pusher trailer, attempting to avoid the thermodynamic losses of an extra energy conversion step.
 

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While I like the idea of range extenders (and would welcome the option), Tesla is pretty set on being pure BEV. I can't see them offering a range-extended option. IMO they'd push dollars into bigger packs and/or quicker recharge times before diverting to an ICE.
And more superchargers. Adding a RE would totally dilute their marketing message and confuse buyers.
 

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I think the REx in the i3 will operate quite differently than the EVer in the Karma. For starters, it will only produce about 35hp, hardly enough to deliver the requisite power for acceleration (even for a 3,000lb car). I think it is really intended as a "limp home" mode since it will provide less than 100 miles of driving range (likely getting 33-42mpg based on some rumors in the European press - that is 80-100 miles of range with a 2.4 gallon tank).
BMW is smart enough to add the ability to charge the battery using the ICE Gen set. The 50KW can charge the 21KW battery pack in one hour on the highway at 55MPH. My 5Active Hybrid has all kinds of GPS terrain technology "pending" which I suspect will be fully functional in the I3. A GPS terrain optimized range extender will work great with a small ICE gen set
 

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I think the REx in the i3 will operate quite differently than the EVer in the Karma. For starters, it will only produce about 35hp, hardly enough to deliver the requisite power for acceleration (even for a 3,000lb car).
True it is different from Fisker's EVer system since with the i3 you can get full performance from the battery alone. The generator does not have to have enough power for acceleration. The vehicle has a comparatively large battery pack, which provides a large buffer. So the generator only has to be able to provide the average power needed.

The tricky bit with this arrangement is the NVH, and mapping the engine sound to the throttle position in a way that isn't too out of whack with driver expectations. GM spent a lot of time getting this right with the Volt. Since the range extender is an option on the i3 (that kind of flexibility typically implies some design compromise), I'm curious to see how well they managed to optimize things.
 
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