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Where can I buy one that's not over priced? I called the dealer twice and no response. Also idk much about these chargers, but do u just plug it in to a 220 outlet similar to when I plug in my 110 into the outlet to charge my car?
 

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My dealer offered me a ~$900 basic charger and ~$1500 Blink smart charger that comes on at cheapest electricity hours (night), both Fisker branded. Then I think there's also an $800 federal tax credit you can apply for. Most people have an electrician install but if you have a 220V circuit nearby definitely easier.
 

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Where can I buy one that's not over priced? I called the dealer twice and no response. Also idk much about these chargers, but do u just plug it in to a 220 outlet similar to when I plug in my 110 into the outlet to charge my car?
You can actually buy them from Home Depot. Check their online store.
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...Id=-1&storeId=10051#/?c=1&browsestoreoption=2

I'm sure you can find models that plug into a 220 V outlet or are hardwired to the breaker box.

What you want is Level 2. If the Karma is going to be your only plug-in vehicle for the near future there is no point getting anything higher than 16 A. The Karma's on-board charger is limited to 3.3kW.
 

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Charged!

Where can I buy one that's not over priced? I called the dealer twice and no response. Also idk much about these chargers, but do u just plug it in to a 220 outlet similar to when I plug in my 110 into the outlet to charge my car?
@Lambo, there is a fair amount of discussion about chargers in this forum. I suggest looking through the threads to get a good overview of the choices.

Here is the executive summary:

1 - There are two broad categories of Level II chargers: (i) Basic chargers that are always ON and start charging your car as soon you plug the car in; and (ii) smart chargers that are programmable and can charge the car at specific times and also have Network connectivity that allows remote monitoring and data collection.

2 - Basic chargers cost around $700 - $900. Smart Chargers cost around $1500.

3 - Both categories of chargers need to be connected to their own 40A fused 220V circuit. You can either wire the charger permanently, or wire in a 220V electric dryer style plug into which you can plug the charger. The former approach results in a cleaner installation while the latter provides more flexibility and enable you to get a portable Level II charger to take with you on longer trips if you think you will have access to a dryer plug during your trip.

4 - Unless you are a master electrician and have experience with 220V wiring, I would strongly suggest that you hire one and also make sure they get all the required permits. Saving a couple of bucks is not worth burning your house down.

5 - Talk to your local utility about special EV rates. It may be worth spending more money on a smart charger if your utility offers super cheap rates late in the evening, for example.

6 - The Federal tax credit for installing home charging equipment expired at the beginning of 2012 but be sure to check with your state and local authorities to see if any subsidies are available for installing chargers.
 

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Just want to add that if the output is limited to 16A, you only need a 20A service.
(Assuming you're in the US.)
 

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The Blink charger only requires a 30 amp circuit, as it tops out at 6.6 kW which is 27.5A at 240V.

All home EVSEs are seriously overpriced. The "smart" ones like the Blink consist of a sub-$100 Linux box that runs a dinky web server and some other data-management toys, wrapped around a relay control system that you could make a tidy profit on at $25. These are wired up with connectors and heavy cabling that all together should sell for no more than $300-$500 to the end user. (There's about the same amount of electronics, code, and electrics in this as in a home A/V control box like the ones from Sonos.)

The "dumb" charger should go for well under $200.

Unfortunately there's no real mass market for these things yet, so there's very little competition.
 

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The Blink charger only requires a 30 amp circuit, as it tops out at 6.6 kW which is 27.5A at 240V.
For a 6.6 kW charger, you actually need a 40 A circuit. In the US the ratings are labeled for temporary/peak loads. Charging an EV is considered a continuous load, and you're only allowed to pull 80% of the labeled rating. (Europe has more sensible labeling.)

Agree about all these EVSEs being overpriced. If you're so inclined, you can build your own and save a few bucks, but either way you pay (in time, if not money).
 

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Well now sell the Blink charger 220 volt with the Fisker Logo on if I'am correct it cost around $800.00 I have new one for the shop which I'am going to try and install tomorrow if you like any pictures or specs from the supplied tech sheet shoot me a PM.
 

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Well now sell the Blink charger 220 volt with the Fisker Logo on if I'am correct it cost around $800.00 I have new one for the shop which I'am going to try and install tomorrow if you like any pictures or specs from the supplied tech sheet shoot me a PM.
The Fisker-branded Blink was about $1500 from my dealer.
 

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The Fisker-branded Blink was about $1500 from my dealer.
That is about the same price that I paid from Ecotality once the shipping was added in.
 

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I've had the $750 charger from Home Depot for 9 months now with no problem. I love the curly orange cord.
BillyO
 

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The "smart" ones like the Blink consist of a sub-$100 Linux box that runs a dinky web server and some other data-management toys, wrapped around a relay control system that you could make a tidy profit on at $25. These are wired up with connectors and heavy cabling that all together should sell for no more than $300-$500 to the end user.
But that's something we call "market economy" :)

Feel free to draw it and box it.
Maybe you can sell the construction kit to Radio Shack or on ebay ... I'd get one.
Do you ship to Germany?




Stefan
 

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I used a "UN-Used" dryer circuit which was 40 amps. With the plug-in GE Intel Unit, it was a simple matter of changing the wall connector type to the matching one. Since the GE Charger doesn't require 110, there is no need for the "white" neutral wire that is used in most dryers to operate the timer, lights, etc. That saved the installation charge of running a separate 40 amp circuit... but it was convenient for me to do so. Home Depot mentioned above had the GE and others there for about $1000.00. Unfortunately the Federal Rebate expired last year. With more electrics/hybrid cars coming, possibly the rebates will return or the price will moderate. I got the charger before I had to Karma delivered. With the ability to charge on the cheapest rate (timing metered electricity), I think the savings helps moderate the initial cost. You may want to check with your local utility on time-of-day usage. I estimate with the new meter, since all electric usage is at the lowest rate at night, I actually charge the car for free. Of course this is life-style dependent.
 
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